Revolutionary Activities

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It’s almost March break up here in the snowy lands. Snow banks are sinking. Roofs drip madly. The maple syrup is running and the pancake houses have put out their open-for-business signs. March break is not the end of winter, but it’s the time you let yourself start longing for spring. Maybe if the schools didn’t let out for a week it wouldn’t stir up every trapped feeling I’ve ever had. But they do and it does. Institutions and structures and culture loom like prison bars on a window begging for a jailbreak. A holiday is great, but I’m feeling revolution.

My opening battle cry of revolutionary activities to be completed or repeated

Give a child directions on how to get somewhere and leave (The grocery store, main street in a small town, the woods, or a major urban center depending on the age.)

Leave children untended with no more than two rules for hours. (Ditto for self)

Sing together for fun (This will be hard if there are too many Catholics unless they play the guitar. According to my observations the majority of guitar playing Catholics are accustomed to singing, the rest are not. So guitars, Protestants, or musicians required if anyone else wants to pull this off.)

Read a book requiring many sittings, out loud with the family. (There is little better than a children’s book to begin with. Reading one out loud with someone else means you get to inhabit another world together. If anyone else feels the same way, some of the most delightful I’ve run across lately: The ***Penderwicks, The Calder Games, Chasing Vermeer, Artemis Fowl . . . and I have it on strong recommendation from a seventy year old and an eleven year old that, “The Borrowers,” though hardly a new release is well worth a read or a reread.)

Write letters. Put them in envelopes with stamps and mail them. (I discovered to my horror in February that although my grade ten son is working to become bilingual and is quite proficient in math, he had no idea how to mail a letter or where to write a return address on the envelope.)

Play board games or cards.  (We are big kitchen table game fans but have been playing only in bits and snatches of 15 -30 minutes. A multi-hour game-fest is calling.) If anyone else is feeling the itch:

Our tried and true: Go Fish, Old Maid, Uno. Trouble or Sorry. Dominoes. Taboo. Pit.

Recent delights:  Settlers of Catan, Seven Wonders of the World, Apples to Apples

The eternal classic that may not have broad based appeal but will forever hold my heart: The Farmers’ Game

 

Poetry is enough to start a revolution all by itself. The kids like to listen to it but I want them memorizing it and writing it. Maybe when I figure out how to put feet on that vision, I’ll write about it. So far it is a mystical yearning with no good ideas to hold it up.

3 Comments to Revolutionary Activities

  1. Patricia says:

    So many memories of games played with visiting friends :). Thank you for that call to rise up.

  2. rachel says:

    Haiku is simple
    nature’s full of samples
    giggle poetry

    .com/poetryclass/Haiku.html

    great for the long trip
    travel to the southern Spring
    the miles will fly by

  3. Jane Parker says:

    One of my fondest childhood memories is of me sitting on my father’s lap while he read poetry to me. Later I read it myself, and re-read it and still remember a few small and one lengthy poem I memorized; I think the memorization evolved from re-reading.